Area AN – Upper Turning Mill Road

5 Dewey Road
5 Dewey Road

Located in North Lexington, the Upper Turning Mill Road neighborhood includes forty-seven contemporary-style houses constructed between 1957 and 1961 on Dewey Road, Gould Road, Grimes Road and Turning Mill Road. The subdivision is located east of Grove Street and is bordered on the south by the 35-acre Paint Mine conservation property. As its name implies, Upper Turning Mill Road is also located north of the Middle Ridge/Turning Mill development which took shape between 1956 and 1963. While Middle Ridge/Turning Mill was initially conceived as a neighborhood of prefabricated “Techbuilt” homes, the slightly later Upper Turning Mill was developed with the award-winning, split-level design known as the “Peacock Farm” House. It is one of four neighborhoods in Lexington developed with houses of this type following the success of the original Peacock Farm neighborhood in Lexington (see Area S). The house design won awards in various national design contests in 1956-7 but nowhere is it found in as great numbers as in Lexington. It was the creation of Cambridge architect and Lexington resident Walter Pierce.

"Peacock Farm" House Diagram

The “Peacock Farm” house contained roughly 1,800 square feet and contained three levels, designed to divide functions. On the exterior, character-defining features include a low-pitch roof with one slope longer than the other, broadly overhanging eaves and stained vertical cedar siding. The houses were individually sited to reflect the contours of each site. In general, this neighborhood retains a high degree of integrity. Although some houses have seen additions, the inherent design of many of the houses remains fully recognizable.

10 Gould Road
10 Gould Road

The adjacent Paint Mine conservation area was established in 1960. Its name goes back to the mid 19th century when the land was briefly explored and/or excavated for ochre pigments. The land on which the residential subdivision was constructed was in the Simonds family for seven generations from the mid 17th century to the mid 1940s.

Entrance to conservation land behind Estabrook School
Entrance to conservation land behind Estabrook School